Bookish Facts

Bookish Fact #6: My dad made me a history lover.

I am lucky in that both of my parents are readers. My mom prefers fiction and reads a lot of mysteries. My dad loves historical nonfiction. My mom may have been the driving force behind my love of reading, but Dad was just as influential on my reading tastes.

We only had one TV growing up, and evenings meant watching things together as a family. The channels were often tuned to a baseball game or some random educational program (How stuff Works, Myth Busters). Dad’s favorite was The History Channel…back went the programming was actually about history.

His favorites were the history of the military, baseball, the space race, industry, and of course aviation. (I happily admit that I adore all these topics as well) We went to museums as a family on a regular basis. He’s sat through hours of me retelling my lessons learned in my college history courses. And to this day he still calls me with book recommendations and requests.

My parents are the reason my nieces and nephews get books for gifts, because can anything really beat the gift of a good story? Have your parents, or some other awesome person, influenced your reading this way? Please share!

Lindsay

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Career of Evil

Career of Evil

by Robert Galbraith

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Cormoran Strike is back, with his assistant Robin Ellacott, in a mystery based around soldiers returning from war.

When a mysterious package is delivered to Robin Ellacott, she is horrified to discover that it contains a woman’s severed leg.

Her boss, private detective Cormoran Strike, is less surprised but no less alarmed. There are four people from his past who he thinks could be responsible – and Strike knows that any one of them is capable of sustained and unspeakable brutality.

With the police focusing on the one suspect Strike is increasingly sure is not the perpetrator, he and Robin take matters into their own hands, and delve into the dark and twisted worlds of the other three men. But as more horrendous acts occur, time is running out for the two of them…

Career of Evil is the third in the series featuring private detective Cormoran Strike and his assistant Robin Ellacott. A mystery and also a story of a man and a woman at a crossroads in their personal and professional lives.

(originally published 05/12/2016)

Career of Evil is the third book in the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith, who is really JK Rowling. Strike’s detective agency is thriving thanks to their last two high profile cases and Robin and Strike are having a difficult time keeping up. Then Robin receives a severed leg in the mail. It doesn’t take long for them to be national news and loosing clients by the minute.

I had to begin the Month of Mystery with Career of Evil! I am a Harry Potter fan but I believe I might be more of a Cormoran Strike fan. Mystery is my go to genre and Career of Evil may be a new favorite.

I like how Galbraith sucker punches both Strike and Robin right at the beginning! Life is going great and then one severed leg manages to ruin the business, put a strain on Robin and Matthew’s relationship, and cause Strike to revisit memories best left forgotten. The mystery is dark and forces us to delve in to the past of some pretty disturbing individuals. Guys, this story managed to make me laugh, cry, yell, and cheer. I’m pretty sure I looked like a crazy person during my work commute.

Expect excellent character development in our two main characters. We get to learn more about the haunting past of both Robin and Strike. We get to watch their friendship deepen and, my personal favorite, we get to see Robin’s stubborn side! I love how she stands up for herself, refusing to let anyone push her around. Galbriath’s writing style leaves me feeling like I am right there watching everything happen. This series really needs to be made in to a tv show or movies!

As for complaints…I wish I didn’t have to wait for the next one! I did have a tough time with the lack of communication between Robin and Cormoran. Robin considers him one of her best friends but they rarely open up to each other despite working long hours together. And all the emotional tension between them….uhg! I need the next book! I’m also still not ok with Matthew as he really doesn’t have any redeeming qualities, but I’m not going to waste time ranting about him.

There is soooo much more I want to share but you just need to read it. Oh, and the ending was PERFECT! I need to read Career of Evil again! Anyone else a Robert Galbraith fan? What did you think of Career of Evil?

Lindsay

The Silkworm

The Silkworm

by Robert Galbraith

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Private investigator Cormoran Strike returns in a new mystery from Robert Galbraith, author of the #1 international bestseller The Cuckoo’s Calling.

When novelist Owen Quine goes missing, his wife calls in private detective Cormoran Strike. At first, Mrs. Quine just thinks her husband has gone off by himself for a few days—as he has done before—and she wants Strike to find him and bring him home.

But as Strike investigates, it becomes clear that there is more to Quine’s disappearance than his wife realizes. The novelist has just completed a manuscript featuring poisonous pen-portraits of almost everyone he knows. If the novel were to be published, it would ruin lives—meaning that there are a lot of people who might want him silenced.

When Quine is found brutally murdered under bizarre circumstances, it becomes a race against time to understand the motivation of a ruthless killer, a killer unlike any Strike has encountered before…

(originially published 10/01/2015)

The Silkworm is the second novel in Robert Galbraith’s (aka JK Rowling) Cormoran Strike mysteries. Feel free to check out my review of the first novel, The Cuckoo’s Calling

I read these novels because I love Cormoran Strike! I like that he’s tall, rough, awkward, and stands out in EVERY crowd. I like that he’s stubborn, irritable, and steadfast in his investigative techniques. The characteristics that would turn most people off make me love him all the more! I would definitely grab a pint with him.

Still, I was not really a fan of The Silkworm. There are two big points that just made the plot ‘eh’ for me. One: the relationship between Robin and Matthew just pissed me off. I just don’t understand why such a smart, independent woman would be with someone as insecure and mean as Matthew. Luckily, Robin stands up for herself and the story ends with what seems to be a healthier future for the couple. But I still found myself yelling at Matthew while reading.

Two: the main storyline, aka the mystery, was too slow for my taste. It drug on and on about Quine’s terrible novel and depressing writing career. I had a difficult time sympathizing with ANY of the ‘literary world’ characters. NONE of them were remotely likable!! Quine’s death was the most interesting aspect of the character! I feel like Galbraith was attempting to humorously releave frustrations with the literary industry but it left The Silkworm’s plot less engaging.

I still recommend the book because of Strike and his character development. Strike is no longer struggling to survive and we are able to see him fully interact with family and friends. I love that his relationship with Robin is bluntly honest and surprisingly full of trust. His self confidence is strengthening since his split with Charlotte and we meet characters that truly love Strike. We see him communicate with his aunt and uncle, who beg him to visit for Christmas. We meet his old school buddy, Chum, who’s willingness to help Strike with no strings attached leaves you wanting to buy them both a beer. And we get to meet Al, the one sibling who adores Strike just the way he is (sister Lucy constantly trying to change him gets old) All of these points make The Silkworm a worthwhile read!

Plus, the ending is AWESOME! Have you read The Silkworm? Share your thoughts!

Lindsay

The Cuckoo’s Calling

The Cuckoo’s Calling

by Robert Galbraith

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A brilliant debut mystery in a classic vein: Detective Cormoran Strike investigates a supermodel’s suicide. After losing his leg to a land mine in Afghanistan, Cormoran Strike is barely scraping by as a private investigator. Strike is down to one client, and creditors are calling. He has also just broken up with his longtime girlfriend and is living in his office.

Then John Bristow walks through his door with an amazing story: His sister, the legendary supermodel Lula Landry, known to her friends as the Cuckoo, famously fell to her death a few months earlier. The police ruled it a suicide, but John refuses to believe that. The case plunges Strike into the world of multimillionaire beauties, rock-star boyfriends, and desperate designers, and it introduces him to every variety of pleasure, enticement, seduction, and delusion known to man.

You may think you know detectives, but you’ve never met one quite like Strike. You may think you know about the wealthy and famous, but you’ve never seen them under an investigation like this.

(review originally shared 03/05/3015)

We all should know by now that Robert Galbraith is a pseudonym for J.K. Rowling, the famous author of the Harry Potter series.  I enjoyed the Harry Potter novels and was excited to see that Rowling has continued to write, but in a completely different genre.  The best compliment that I can give Galbraith/Rowling is that I didn’t think of Harry Potter once while reading The Cuckoo’s Calling! 

Cormoran Strike is a down-on-his-luck private investigator who is hired to prove that legendary supermodel, Lula Landry, did not commit suicide.  The investigation thrusts Strike in to the world of the rich and famous; a world where lies are far more common than the truth.  I listened to the audio version of The Cuckoo’s Calling and found myself sitting parked in my driveway long after I had arrived home because I couldn’t stop listening!  Galbraith has done a fantastic job with the mystery genre.

The characters are complex and well developed; I had no problem visualizing each individual.  The setting was equally developed, and I can still smell the lime air freshener Cormoran uses in his office.  I loved Cormoran Strike; of course, I have a thing for burly cop characters…so yeah.  Cormoran and Robin’s relationship still makes me smile.  The mystery progressed at a realistic rate and I was kept guessing until the very end.

I only had a couple of issues.  The first is how Strike reveals the reason behind his breakup with Charlotte.  He just spits it out.  It is an important moment and I felt it should have been rehashed for the readers.  I could have used one extra paragraph where Strike relives the moment one last time before he lets it go.  The second is when Strike meets with the killer.  I felt Strike should have actually had a plan in that moment.  I won’t say anything else because of spoilers, but you’ll know what I’m talking about when you read it.

The Cuckoos Calling is a great read!  Kudos Rowling; you’re a good mystery author.  Book two, The Silkworm is on my TBR list.  Have you read The Cuckoo’s Calling?  What do you think about Robert Galbraith/JK Rowling’s mystery novels?

Lindsay

Books or Film?

We’ve all been there. The credits are rolling and someone loudly states, “Well the book was better.” Maybe you’re the one who said it. Maybe your the person rolling your eyes because of course the 600 page book was better. Or maybe your the one who hasn’t had the chance to read the book or has no desire to read it. In the end of the movies stays relatively true to the book…does it really matter?

I like to think I’m pretty easy going but I’m not when it comes to books (sheepishly admitting to the half hour rant I had about YA editing yesterday). But, I firmly believe that movies based on books can be AMAZING! (The Giver, Harry Potter, and so on) Of course the movie cant deviate from the book’s storyline or change characters’ personalities. It needs to remain true to the story.

I prefer TV shows over movies. And I’ve been struggling with a frustrating reading slump the last month. So imagine how thrilled I was to see that one of my favorite mystery series, the Cormoran Strike series by Robert Galbraith (JK Rowling), has been turned into a tv series. And I could stream it through Amazon!

This week I’ll be resharing my reviews for the first three books in series, The Cuckoo’s Calling, The Silkworm, and Career of Evil. And this weekend I will proceed to binge watch the entire show! People, it’s ridiculous how excited I am.

Let me know if you’ve seen the series. Are you a fan of the books? And where do you stand on the books to film debate?

Happy Reading!

Lindsay

Bookish Facts

Bookish Fact #5: My mom made me a reader.

(sorry for the two week hiatus guys. I’m blaming the holiday weekend and internet issues)

My mom is definitely the reason I am an avid reader today. She was the one who taught me how to read. She introduced me to the joys of mystery by getting me into The Boxcar Children series. She sparked my imagination by reading Hank the Cowdog before bedtime and giving each character their own unique voice.

Mom drug me to the local used bookstore at least once a month, and never declined a requested afternoon trip to Hastings. She’s the reason I give books as gifts to my nieces and nephews.

I honestly don’t know what life would be like without all those stories influencing my life. So, thanks Mom for sharing the joy of reading! And developing my love for a good mystery. ☺️ You’re the best!

Lindsay

Second Quarter Update/Midyear Check-in

I have decided to do numbered quarterly updates instead of using the seasons. It’s just hard to call this a Spring Update when the heat index has been over 100 degrees (Fahrenheit) the last week. So here is my update for the second quarter of the year; these are the books I finished in April, May, and June.

TOTAL: 7

I struggled with my reading this quarter. I have stack of books about 15 deep that I started and just couldn’t get into to finish. I am going to blame this funk of trying to recover from surgery and the stress of changes at work. I’m hoping to double my number in the next quarter.

Mystery: 4

 

Nonfiction: 3

Reread: 1

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The best part of this quarter is that I really enjoyed everything I read. I am happy at the number of nonfiction books I sailed through and I hope to keep that nonfiction momentum going through the rest of the year. I am also hoping to at least double the number of books I read next quarter.

Mid-Year Goals Check-in

Total Books Read

Goal: 50       Current: 16

Nonfiction Books Read

Goal: 12      Current: 5

I’m already working on my TBR for the next quarter. Let me know what books you plan to read this summer!

Lindsay

The Murder at the Vicarage

Murder at the Vicarage

by Agatha Christie

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Murder at the Vicarage marks the debut of Agatha Christie’s unflappable and much beloved female detective, Miss Jane Marple. With her gift for sniffing out the malevolent side of human nature, Miss Marple is led on her first case to a crime scene at the local vicarage. Colonel Protheroe, the magistrate whom everyone in town hates, has been shot through the head. No one heard the shot. There are no leads. Yet, everyone surrounding the vicarage seems to have a reason to want the Colonel dead. It is a race against the clock as Miss Marple sets out on the twisted trail of the mysterious killer without so much as a bit of help from the local police.

You may remember I raved about Christie’s A Caribbean Mystery a few months ago. I just loved reading the adventures of the snarky Miss Marple and decided I was going to read the entire Marple Mystery series from start to finish. So I picked up Murder at the Vicarage.

Sadly, it took me a while to get into the story. Murder at the Vicarage is told from the Vicar’s point of view instead of Miss Marple’s. The Vicar comes home to discover the body of a prominent individual slummed over the writing desk in his study. He then takes it upon himself to figure out what happened, with his congregation jumping at the chance to share their gossip with him. The Vicar is a kind, smart, and curious character but he doesn’t hold a candle to Miss Marple. Murder at the Vicarage lacked the level of snark I had enjoyed in A Caribbean Mystery.

The story starts slow and builds momentum as the murder investigation progresses. It was fun seeing the nuances of the small town unfold on the pages, and I became more invested in the story as Miss Marple steadily made her opinions of the investigation known. The mystery is a tad convoluted but fun, and Marple’s big reveal at the end was fantastic.

Murder at the Vicarage was a good start to the series. It isn’t my favorite story, but one I would still recommend just because of Christie’s fantastic mystery writing! Have you read Murder at the Vicarage? Let me know what you thought!

Lindsay

Bookish Facts

Bookish Fact #4: I like to read outside.

I will read anywhere, and I like to read curled up on my couch or at a local coffee shop with a good cup of coffee. Reading outside is my favorite. I enjoy sitting at the beach with a fun story listening to the waves. I love sitting in our historic downtown outside a local shop listening to people pass by as the breeze flows down the street.

Now reading outside does have a downside….the people. I like to have some external distraction while reading but so often I find myself having to listen to one sided phone conversations, people loudly conversing, or blaring music from shop fronts. I have luckily found a few places that offer the perfect environment for reading and I go as often as I can!

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Where is your favorite reading spot? Do you like to read outside? Do you like a little distraction when reading? Let me know!

Lindsay

The Big Over Easy

The Big Over Easy

by Jasper Fforde

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Jasper Fforde does it again with a dazzling new series starring Inspector Jack Spratt, head of the Nursery Crime Division.

Jasper Fforde’s bestselling Thursday Next series has delighted readers of every genre with its literary derring-do and brilliant flights of fancy. In The Big Over Easy, Fforde takes a break from classic literature and tumbles into the seedy underbelly of nursery crime. Meet Inspector Jack Spratt, family man and head of the Nursery Crime Division. He’s investigating the murder of ovoid D-class nursery celebrity Humpty Dumpty, found shattered to death beneath a wall in a shabby area of town. Yes, the big egg is down, and all those brittle pieces sitting in the morgue point to foul play.

(I originally shared this review on June 16, 2015…so three years ago! I have been struggling to stick with a book this summer and The Big Over Easy felt like a perfect reread. I still stand by what I originally said about the book and I’m loving it even more the second time around! Enjoy!)

Jack Spratt is in charge of the Nursery Crimes Division of Reading, a division on the verge of losing its budget thanks to his recent inability to convict the Three Little Pigs of murdering the Big Bad Wolf. Then the smashed remains of Humpty Dumpty are found next to a wall and Jack knows it wasn’t suicide. Now Jack must find the murderer, save his misfit division, and keep sleuthing celebrity, DCI Friedland Chimes, off the case.

I absolutely loved The Big Over Easy. Thank you for the recommendation Polly! Each page is packed with nursery rhyme references but it never feels overwhelming as the passages are so matter-or-fact. It leaves you with this nagging feeling that these events actually happened. Fforde’s dry, sarcastic humor kept my snickering and speeding through the novel. The Jack and the Beanstalk references killed me every time!

My only complaint is the climax chapters were too fast paced for me in comparison to the rest of the story. That’s it for me but I did take some time to read the few negative reviews of The Big Over Easy. My response to them is: do NOT read this book if you don’t like murder mysteries. It’s a murder mystery that mocks the elaborate and showy nature of modern mystery development. How can you expect to like that when you don’t enjoy mystery novels?! Other reviewers complain that Fforde is trying too hard to be clever and only includes all the nursery rhyme information to make his readers feel smart when they get the references. You’ve got to be kidding me. Yes, the clever jokes and writing style may be too much for some but I highly doubt Fforde is more concerned with boosting the ego of his readers over the need to provide a good complex story. My only advice for such thinkers is that you should get over yourself and learn to enjoy the mechanics and discipline required to write a well balanced story.

Fforde’s jaw dropping ability to expertly meld so much research and detail in to one murder mystery has me wanting to be a better writer. I recommend The Big Over Easy to writers, as well as readers, as a prime example of a writing style that remains showing despite being so informational.

Have you discovered the Nursery Crimes Division? It’s time you should!

Lindsay