Last of the Breed

Last of the Breed

by Louis L’Amour

Last of the Breed

After U.S. Air Force Major Joe Mack is forced down in Russia and later escapes from a Soviet prison camp, he calls upon the skills of his Sioux Indian forebears to evade Alekhin, the Yakut native and legendary tracker, on his trail.

My husband loves to learn about basic survival skills; I enjoy reading survival stories.  We both want to be prepared to live in ‘the wild’ if we must.  We aren’t doomsday preppers or anything, but we do fly small airplanes and live in an area frequented by hurricanes.  Things could happen, and these survival stories are for educational purposes!  Louis L’amour’s Last of the Breed is the one story that I just can not stop reading.  I have read it between 5 to 10 times in the last 13 years and each time I am riveted!

Joe Mack is a Sioux who is also a test pilot for the Air Force.  He is captured by the Russians and brought to Siberia for interrogation.  Joe Mack refuses to remain a prisoner and he quickly escapes.  But he now much survive a Siberian winter and it will require all his military and ancestral training to make it out alive.  (Now I want to start reading it again!)

Last of the Breed was originally published in 1986 and the writing style is somewhat different than current publications.  The language is often more telling than showing, which requires a vivid imagination to fill in all the glorious details.  Luckily, I have one of those, but many reviews complain that the novel drags on because of it.  L’Amour also has a tendency to repeat himself…a lot.  I blame the editing process because this should have been fixed before publication.  The only time it bugged me was when the next sentence would be a reworded copy of the previous sentence.  That is an editing issue.

Don’t let this deter you because the story is great!  I am enthralled by Joe Mack and his journey across Siberia.  Plus, L’Amour provides an interesting cast of supporting characters for you to both love and hate.  I hold my breath as Talya and her father rush to the Chinese border.  I whisper “yes!” each time Joe Mack escapes; and I curse Alekhin as he hunts Joe Mack down.  But, this is more than a story of sheer survival.  L’Amour also describes the mental strain of surviving and living on the run.  These passages left me with goose-bumps as the fear of being hunted courses through me while Alekhin closes in on Joe Mack.  I know how the story ends, but that doesn’t matter.  I feel like I am there in Siberia every time I open this book.

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Last of the Breed will always be one of my favorites and I plan to keep rereading it.  I mean, just look at my personal copy!  Why hasn’t it been made in to a movie?!  Anyways, happy survival reading everyone😛

Lindsay

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Milo Talon

Milo Talon
by Louis L’amour

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Milo Talon knew the territory and the good men from the bad. He had ridden the Outlaw Trail and could find out things others couldn’t. That was why a rich man named Jefferson Henry hired Milo to hunt down a missing girl. But from the moment Milo began his search, he knew something wasn’t right. Three people had already died, an innocent woman was on the run, and a once sleepy town was getting crowded with hired guns.

Suddenly, Milo Talon realized that there were still things he had to learn—about the woman he was trying to find, the man who had hired him, and the murderer who wanted him dead. But most of all, Milo had a few things to learn about himself. And he would have to work fast, because one mistake could cost him his life.…

I’m including westerns because I have always considered them a form of historical fiction. Plus, this is my all-time favorite western and it has a great mystery!

I love Milo Talon! Im a fan of his blunt personality and desire to do the right thing by good people. He’s just a good guy with a sharp whit and smart mouth who stands up for his friends. What’s not to like?! I also enjoy the supporting cast of characters L’amour provides our reluctant hero: the pretty girl in need of help, the kind ex-trail cook, and the mysterious horse wranglers. But Milo Talon is more than just a simple cowboy story. L’amour, the king of the western, weaves a complex mystery that starts with the search for a missing girl and cumulates with Milo and Molly running for their lives from parties greedy for railroad money. The mystery and the characters keep me coming back to this novel time and time again, and I need for it to be made into a movie. Now!

I do have to say that some readers are not going to appreciate the development of Milo and Molly’s relationship. There are no sappy details and it can read a tad unrealistic and abrupt. I love it, but I understand it’s not for most. Also, L’amour’s writing style is not the most showing. The language is blunt and straight forward, but I still feel like I’m right in the middle of the action while reading.

READ IT! Milo Talon is my all time favorite western and I want to hear what you think. I promise the ending is well worth it!

Lindsay

Milo Talon

Milo Talon

by Louis L’amour

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Milo Talon knew the territory and the good men from the bad. He had ridden the Outlaw Trail and could find out things others couldn’t. That was why a rich man named Jefferson Henry hired Milo to hunt down a missing girl. But from the moment Milo began his search, he knew something wasn’t right. Three people had already died, an innocent woman was on the run, and a once sleepy town was getting crowded with hired guns. Suddenly, Milo Talon realized that there were still things he had to learn—about the woman he was trying to find, the man who had hired him, and the murderer who wanted him dead. But most of all, Milo had a few things to learn about himself. And he would have to work fast, because one mistake could cost him his life.…

Last week I had the sudden need to read Milo Talon. So, I picked up my worn paperback and dove in to the story of my favorite western character.

I love Milo Talon! Im a fan of his blunt personality and desire to do the right thing by good people. He’s just a good guy with a sharp whit and smart mouth who stands up for his friends. What’s not to like?! I also enjoy the supporting cast of characters L’amour provides our reluctant hero: the pretty girl in need of help, the kind ex-trail cook, and the mysterious horse wranglers. But Milo Talon is more than just a simple cowboy story. L’amour, the king of the western, weaves a complex mystery that starts with the search for a missing girl and cumulates with Milo and Molly running for their lives from parties greedy for railroad money. The mystery and the characters keep me coming back to this novel time and time again, and I need for it to be made into a movie. Now!

I do have to say that some readers are not going to appreciate the development of Milo and Molly’s relationship. There are no sappy details and it can read a tad unrealistic and abrupt. I love it, but I understand it’s not for most. Also, L’amour’s writing style is not the most showing. The language is blunt and straight forward, but I still feel like I’m right in the middle of the action while reading.

READ IT! Milo Talon is my all time favorite western and I want to hear what you think. I promise the ending is well worth it!

Lindsay

5 Fandom Friday

   So, Liz at Nerd in the City introduced me to 5 Fandom Friday.  A topic is posted each Friday by The Nerdy Girlie and Super Space Chick, and you list your top five answers.  I just couldn’t pass on this week!

5 Fandom Friday

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Characters I Would Name My Kids After

Mike and I will probably have kids some day.  I love fun names, but it has been decided that our eventual children will have family names.  Sigh…fine.  But, here are my choices if I could name my kids after my favorite characters!

1. Carter

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Jack Carter in Eureka will always be one of my favorite characters.  He is responsible for the crazy Eureka scientists and their often disastrous experiments.  He may constantly be in danger but he always tackles his problems with a great sense of humor.  Carter is my number one name choice for both a little girl and a little boy!

2. Myka

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Myka Bering is one kickass woman.  She is the moral compass for the Warehouse 13 team; always there to remind them what’s right and wrong.  She isn’t perfect, as she has a few issues of her own to deal with, but she always comes out strong and confident in the end.  Plus, she’s a bibliophile!

3. Karigan

Green Rider (Green Rider, #1)

Karigan G’ladheon is the main character of Kristen Britain’s Green Rider series.  I have read this book at least 15 times.  Karigan stumbles into a job as a Green Rider, a king’s messenger, and is thrust in to a life of magic and adventure.  She starts out as a whiny and stubborn kid and eventually grows in to a strong self-sufficient woman capable of saving a king.

4. Milo

Milo Talon

Louis L’Amour’s Milo Talon; I love everything about this name!  Milo is a tracker journeying through the Wild West in search of a missing girl.  He is quiet, kind, and doesn’t take shit from anyone.  He is a man who follows his gut and thinks quick on his feet.

5. Cole

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Yep, two cowboy influenced names.  El Dorado will always be my favorite John Wayne western.  John Wayne is Cole Thornton, a sharpshooter who returns to El Dorado to help the drunken sheriff save the town from some slick city swindlers.  He may have no problem gunning down a man, but only for the right reasons.  Who can’t admire a man who risks his life to save a friend?

6. Pete

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I couldn’t just pick 5!  Pete Lattimer is the reason I love Warehouse 13.  He is kind, funny, and has a deep love of cookies.  He has plenty of his own demons, but he refuses to let that kill his happiness.  He has found his place at Warehouse 13, and he is determined to enjoy every minute of it!

Those are my choices!  Which characters would you name your children (real or imaginary) after?

Lindsay

All images are from imdb.com and Goodreads.

Last of the Breed

Last of the Breed

by Louis L’Amour

Last of the Breed

After U.S. Air Force Major Joe Mack is forced down in Russia and later escapes from a Soviet prison camp, he calls upon the skills of his Sioux Indian forebears to evade Alekhin, the Yakut native and legendary tracker, on his trail.

My husband loves to learn about basic survival skills; I enjoy reading survival stories.  We both want to be prepared to live in ‘the wild’ if we must.  We aren’t doomsday preppers or anything, but we do fly small airplanes and live in an area frequented by hurricanes.  Things could happen, and these survival stories are for educational purposes!  Louis L’amour’s Last of the Breed is the one story that I just can not stop reading.  I have read it between 5 to 10 times in the last 13 years and each time I am riveted!

Joe Mack is a Sioux who is also a test pilot for the Air Force.  He is captured by the Russians and brought to Siberia for interrogation.  Joe Mack refuses to remain a prisoner and he quickly escapes.  But he now much survive a Siberian winter and it will require all his military and ancestral training to make it out alive.  (Now I want to start reading it again!)

Last of the Breed was originally published in 1986 and the writing style is somewhat different than current publications.  The language is often more telling than showing, which requires a vivid imagination to fill in all the glorious details.  Luckily, I have one of those, but many reviews complain that the novel drags on because of it.  L’Amour also has a tendency to repeat himself…a lot.  I blame the editing process because this should have been fixed before publication.  The only time it bugged me was when the next sentence would be a reworded copy of the previous sentence.  That is an editing issue.

Don’t let this deter you because the story is great!  I am enthralled by Joe Mack and his journey across Siberia.  Plus, L’Amour provides an interesting cast of supporting characters for you to both love and hate.  I hold my breath as Talya and her father rush to the Chinese border.  I whisper “yes!” each time Joe Mack escapes; and I curse Alekhin as he hunts Joe Mack down.  But, this is more than a story of sheer survival.  L’Amour also describes the mental strain of surviving and living on the run.  These passages left me with goose-bumps as the fear of being hunted courses through me while Alekhin closes in on Joe Mack.  I know how the story ends, but that doesn’t matter.  I feel like I am there in Siberia every time I open this book.

FullSizeRender

Last of the Breed will always be one of my favorites and I plan to keep rereading it.  I mean, just look at my personal copy!  Why hasn’t it been made in to a movie?!  Anyways, happy survival reading everyone 😛

Lindsay