CB Strike Update

I love JK Rowling’s Cormoran Strike mystery series written under her pseudonym, Robert Galbraith. I actually prefer this series over Harry Potter….(there. I SAID IT. I love this series. Its fantastic)

So you can only imagine how excited I was to find the books had been turned into a tv series and that it was available on Cinemax/Amazon Prime. Guys…I full on fan-girled and then subjected my husband to three books worth of episodes. He was less than thrilled but I am one happy girl who is ready to binge watch the entire series again. (I reshared by initial reviews of The Cuckoo’s Calling, The Silkwormand Career of Evil before watching the show.)

So how does it hold up to the original books? I think the tv adaption is awesome!

The tv adaptation stays relatively true to the stories. The setting is visually spectacular; the gray/blue lighting emphasizing the darker aspects of both the crimes and Strike’s personal struggles. I felt the cast was well picked. Tom Burke played the perfect Strike and I was happy with Holliday Grainger’s representation of Robin. Even the secondary characters, such as Shanker and Matthew, were just well done. And the best part….they didn’t change the storylines too much! (that’s always a big deal in my opinion)

I wish the episodes were longer. I felt that each book could have had an additional episode devoted to the story because there were so many fantastic details that you miss if you haven’t read the books. This includes the details of both Strike and Robin’s pasts, the minutia of the investigations, and Strike’s investigative relationships.

My one actual complaint….Matthew was too nice. The Matthew of the books is an insecure, controlling jerk. I can’t stand him. I finished the last book wanting nothing more than for Robin to leave him. The Matthew of the series was a more reasonable shadow of the man in the books. Sure he was still insecure and self centered but he’s no where near as whining and controlling as he should have been portrayed. It left me annoyed that he was more likable than he should have been.

WATCH IT! READ THE BOOKS! And then let me know what you think! In the meantime…I think I’m going to watch it again. Happy Reading!

Lindsay

Advertisements

Water for Elephants

Water for Elephants

by Sara Gruen

43641

An atmospheric, gritty, and compelling novel of star-crossed lovers, set in the circus world circa 1932 illuminated by a wonderful sense of time and place. Winner of the 2007 BookBrowse Award for Most Popular Book.

An atmospheric, gritty, and compelling novel of star-crossed lovers, set in the circus world circa 1932, by the bestselling author of Riding Lessons.

When Jacob Jankowski, recently orphaned and suddenly adrift, jumps onto a passing train, he enters a world of freaks, drifters, and misfits, a second-rate circus struggling to survive during the Great Depression, making one-night stands in town after endless town. A veterinary student who almost earned his degree, Jacob is put in charge of caring for the circus menagerie. It is there that he meets Marlena, the beautiful young star of the equestrian act, who is married to August, the charismatic but twisted animal trainer. He also meets Rosie, an elephant who seems untrainable until he discovers a way to reach her.

Beautifully written, Water for Elephants is illuminated by a wonderful sense of time and place. It tells a story of a love between two people that overcomes incredible odds in a world in which even love is a luxury that few can afford.

Some of you may be asking after the post from earlier this week, “why did she include circus stories on her ‘creepy Halloween’ TBR?” Well, let me explain. First, I am absolutely terrified of clowns. I am not going to go into the details of why, just know that I did not see the reincarnation of IT just as I couldn’t force myself (at 18 years old) to make it through the original IT without crying in fear. Second, after finally attending a Ringling Bros circus performance in my early 20s, I was hooked. There is something magical and wondrous about the world of the circus and each October I find myself returning to this bright, mysterious culture. So, expect a couple circus stories this month, and the first is Water for Elephants.

I initially heard about Water for Elephants when the movie came out in 2011. I was intrigued with the story because circus, but almost immediately decided not to read the book. Guys, I will openly admit that I can be a bit of a book snob, and if ‘everyone’ just LOVES a book…..it probably won’t live up to the hype. (Please don’t tell me how stupid this is. I KNOW IT IS! I just can’t help my snobby reaction.) So, instead I spent my time reading stuff like The Night Circus and Girl on a Wire. But this year, I couldn’t stop wondering about the story, and decided to finally pick up Water for Elephants on a couple of trusted friends’ recommendation.

Guys, I loved it! (I know..I know) The book was fantastic! I am not going to add a summary of the story because this post will be long enough as is, but I will say that my favorite aspect of Water for Elephants is how it jumps between Jacob’s current stay in the nursing home and his memories of the circus. Jacob’s modern experience was heart wrenching and yet still humorous. His self awareness was brutally refreshing and eye-opening for someone who hasn’t been forced to experience such a regulated reality. Even now, tears come to my eyes when I remember certain revelations shared by 90, or 93, year old Jacob. I would recommend Water for Elephants just because of that starkly honest storyline.

But, I didn’t initially pick up this book for the modern half, and thankfully Jacob’s memories of the circus seamlessly melded with his current reality. Gruen had me hooked with her gorgeous and unapologetically gritty descriptions of life during the great depression. From Jacob’s loss of security, to the brutal form of animal training, and the fear of a lost job and starvation, I felt like I was there desperately hoping for life. This was a world where people were not free to follow their dreams, but were forced to focus on mere survival. And yet amidst this life of necessity, there is this magical world of the circus. A world of bright lights and mystery that arrives and disappears in one day. A world that promises excitement as big cats prowl, elephants march, and horses prance under the big top. And a disgruntled clown, sordid peepshow, and extensive amount of shoveled animal waste only enhanced the atmosphere. Every character was realistically flawed, and I felt the sadist August was the perfect villain. And I am shocked to still find myself thinking about Walter, the Shakespeare loving clown. So despite the extensive animal and human abuse, I found myself immersed in the culture. Gruen provides a story that feels historically accurate, including the good and bad aspects of people/life in the 1930s.

My only negative point for the book was the development of Marlena. I didn’t feel she was fully hashed out as a character. Yes, we see both her good qualities and her flaws, but I just felt like something was missing. That we were still viewing her through some type of rose colored glasses. And I realized, while writing this review, that even though the circus storyline is presented as the main story, it is still a visualization of Jacob’s memories. And one truth about life is that love is blind. And Jacob loves Marlena. So, I really can not call this a negative aspect of the story because this is how Jacob would remember her.

Now as for the movie….sigh. I didn’t think it was bad; I just think it could have been better. I watched the movie the same day I finished the book, and I was happy with how August and Uncle Al were combined into one character. Same with Greg and Camel. And Robert Pattinson was absolutely perfect as Jacob. I just felt the pacing did not do justice to the story. How can the movie be both slow and very jumpy? Characters were not explored; the culture was not explained. I knew the nuances of these people and their world because I had just stepped out of their story. But I wouldn’t have felt compelled to read the book if I had watched the movie first. Especially with the ending lacking the immense joy of the book’s. The book was just better.

Read Water for Elephants. It is a wonderful story and has taught me to ignore my book snob tendencies. Which circus books are your favorite?

Lindsay

The Giver – Movie Adaptation

Movie – The Giver

The Giver (2014) Poster

This lazy Saturday afternoon was spent at the movies.  We had initially planned on seeing Guardians of the Galaxy until arriving to a sold out show, so the family agreed to see The Giver.  I was beyond excited and somehow managed to keep my shrieks of delight silent.  I love going to the movies and am one who enjoys watching my favorite stories transformed on the ‘big screen.’  So here is a short review about the movie and how it compared to Louis Lowery’s The Giver.

The movie is visually amazing and only enhanced the images described by Lowery.  The use of color to emphasize the change from sameness to individuality is worth the price of admissions.  My favorite scene is when Jonas first experiences a sunset and Jeff Bridges is perfect as the Giver.  I was thrilled that the story was not morphed in to one of teenage angst or an intense action movie.

The movie does not stray far from the original story but there are a number of modified details.  None of these changes left me upset or disappointed; as a matter of fact, many of these changes strengthened all of the secondary characters.  I recommend fans of the book check out this interview with Lowery about the movie adaptation.

I recommend seeing The Giver!  I left the theater with a smile on my face and ready to watch it again.  Has anyone else seen it?

Lindsay